Walking For Exercise

This program is designed to elevate individual performance, increase overall fitness, strength, endurance and cardiovascular capacity. (If you have a dog walk it, if not walk with your spouse or friend, with a group or alone).

Keeping physically fit has been a high priority throughout my life. I have been able to maintain a healthy lifestyle and manage my weight within 10 to 15 lbs of when I graduated from college in 1976. I recently took the “Real Age” test at, www.realage.com a scientific way of calculating a number that reflects your overall state of health rather than you calendar age.

Calendar Age

54.8

RealAge

47.8

Difference

-7.0

Check it out for yourself and find out what your Real Age is and start a plan for successful aging and living longer.

For six years I averaged running 30-40 miles per week. Completing six consecutive “Army 10 Milers” and three “Marine Corps Marathons” during the six-year period (1989-1995). Conditioning as a way of life became very stressful on my knees and I had to stop running. In order to reach an adequate level of physical fitness, I began walking. The benefits from walking daily were so significant; I devised the following program while in the U.S. Army Reserve:

Pacers - Walking For Exercise

Goal: Able to execute a 21-Day Walking for Exercise Program to obtain the optimum fitness levels possible through walking.

Environment: Given all-weather terrain, instructional techniques and proper equipment.

(Commit to drinking at least 8ozs of water 8 times a day using X2O- www.foundfitness.com )

Achievement: Measure Time, Distance and Speed, before, during and after the 21-Day program, record difference, increasing distance and speed while maintaining constant time.

Imagine this. You have completed the 21 days of positive habit changing Walking for Exercise Program. You look and feel much better and lost a few pounds. With confidence high, you are able to jog a few miles, have a faster walking pace, a healthier life style and able to enjoy regular exercise.  

Start with some warm-up exercises: stretching and light calisthenics. Continue directly to walking using the following technique. Finish by cooling down. Record activities and take pulse.

Read More Here:

https://issuu.com/dclifemagazine/docs/dcl2011fallissue/12


0 Comments Write your comment

    1. Loading...